Tag Archives: quantic

LHC produces first results

Since the Large Hadron Collider went back in business, all sort of rumors have been circling the scientific circles (and not only). However, until these rumors are proven wrong or right, the first official paper on proton collisions from the Large Hadron Collider has been published in this week’s edition of Springer’s European Physical Journal C. .

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Designed to reach the highest energy ever explored in particle accelerators, it features a circular tunnel with the circumference of 27 km. Since it’s been recommissioned, a total of 284 collisions have been recorded, all of which have been analyzed and interpreted. The researchers have been able to determine what is called ‘pseudorapidity density’ (the average number of charged particles that are emitted perpendicular to the beam direction. The goal of this was to compare the results with those obtained in the case of proton-antiproton collisions that took place in the same conditions.

The paper was published by ALICE (a Large Ion Collider Experiment that brings together authors from 113 institutions). As well as the actual results, the paper also explains how their detecting and analyzing system works. The results are not only consistent with earlier measurements, but they also fit the theoretical model produced by researchers.

Dr. Jürgen Schukraft from CERN and ALICE spokesperson said: “This important benchmark test illustrates the excellent functioning and rapid progress of the LHC accelerator, and of both the hardware and software of the ALICE experiment, in this early start-up phase. LHC and its experiments have finally entered the phase of physics exploitation.”

Meet the world’s most powerful X-Ray laser

homerThe first experiments with this laser (Linac Coherent Light Source) have been given the green light at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The illuminating of objects and processing speed will take place at an unprecedented scale, promising groundbreaking research in physics, chemistry, biology and numerous other fields.

“No one has ever had access to this kind of light before,” said LCLS Director Jo Stöhr. “The realization of the LCLS isn’t only a huge achievement for SLAC, but an achievement for the global science community. It will allow us to study the atomic world in ways never before possible.”

Early experiments are already showing some promise, providing insight on fundaments of atoms and molecules, underlying their properties. The short term goal is to create stop action frames for molecules in motion. By putting together many of these images to create a film, scientists will create for the first time a film with actual molecules in motion, being able to see chemical molecules bond and break, as well as actually see how atoms interact at a quantum level.

“It’s hard to overstate how successful these first experiments have been,” said AMO Instrument Scientist John Bozek. “We look forward to even better things to come.”