Coronavirus in Nevada — live updates, cases, and news

Coronavirus cases and fatalities in Nevada

A regularly-updated map of confirmed COVID-19 cases, borough by borough.

The number is based on confirmed diagnostic tests. It is very likely that the true number of COVID-19 cases is higher as many cases are asymptomatic.

New COVID-19 cases and fatalities per day in Nevada

This is a good indicator of “flattening the curve” — when there is a steady decreasing trend, it is an indicator that the spread of the disease is slowing down.

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Cases, updates, and charts on the coronavirus crisis for each US state and territory. Just follow the links below.

Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
Alabama
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Guam
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Northern Mariana Islands
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virgin Islands
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

NEVADA HEALTH RESPONSE: COVID-19

Prepare, Don’t Panic!

To inform Nevadans statewide, the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Governor’s Office have created this website to better share information and resources as it pertains to the current status of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and its impact within the state of Nevada.

Q: What is Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)?
A: A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold. COVID-19 causes illnesses that can range from mild to more severe.

Q: Who is at risk of contracting COVID-19?

A: According to the CDC, for the majority of people, the immediate risk of being exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to be moderate. The CDC’s current risk assessment includes:

  • People in places where ongoing community spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 has been reported are at elevated risk of exposure, with increase in risk dependent on the location.
  • Healthcare workers caring for patients with COVID-19 are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Close contacts of persons with COVID-19 also are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Travelers returning from affected international locations where community spread is occurring also are at elevated risk of exposure, with increase in risk dependent on location.

According to the CDC, some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

  • Older adults
  • People who have serious chronic medical conditions like:
  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Lung disease

For more information visit the CDC’s website.

Q: What are the symptoms of COVID-19?
A: Most patients with COVID-19 have reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness. Symptoms can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath, difficulty breathing

At this time, the CDC believes that symptoms of COVID 19 may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure.

Q: How does COVID-19 spread?
A: The virus is most likely to spread through:

  • close contact with an infectious person
  • respiratory droplets produced when an infectious person coughs or sneezes
  • touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes

Q: What is the treatment for COVID-19?
A: There are no medications specifically approved for COVID-19. Most people with illnesses due to common coronavirus infections recover on their own by drinking plenty of fluids, resting, and taking pain and fever medications. For patients who are more severely ill, medical care or hospitalization may be required. The medical community is continuing to learn more about COVID-19, and treatment may change over time.

Q: What can I do to keep myself and others healthy?
A: There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to take precautions to avoid exposure to this virus, which are similar to the precautions you take to avoid the flu:

  • Follow social distancing protocols set forth by the Nevada Health Response Medical Advisory Team.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others.
  • If possible, stay home from work, school and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. Serious respiratory illnesses are spread by cough, sneezing or unclean hands.
  • Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school. Especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food


Coronavirus in Nevada News:

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