Consuming Fish During Pregnancy Improves Child’s IQ: Study

Infants born to mothers who consumed more fish during pregnancy have recorded improved verbal intelligence, fine motor skills and pro-social behavior, says a latest study. The study, reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition was  coordinated by the University of Granada(Spain) professor Cristina Campoy Folgoso. The researchers collected blood samples from 2,000 women at 20 gestational weeks and from the umbilical cord of the infant at birth for the study.

This study was conducted within the framework of the NUTRIMENTHE project (“Effect of diet on offspring’s cognitive development”), which received funding of 5.9 million Euros from the European 7th Framework Programme.

It is believed that the chemical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) contained in the fish oil contributes to the normal development of the brain and eye of the fetus and breastfed infants.

The European Commission also supports this view  with the fish oil being the primary source of long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the main component of brain cell membranes.

The researchers collected blood samples from 2 000 women at 20 gestational weeks and from the umbilical cord of the infant at birth, and analyzed concentrations of long-chain fatty acids of the series omega-3 and omega-6.Then, they determined the genotype of 18 polymorphisms in the FADS gene cluster.

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal fish intake -as a source of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids- on fetal development, and to determine how the different genotypes affect long-chain fatty acid concentrations in the fetus.

Dr. Pauline Emmett (University of Bristol), Dr. Eva Lattka (Helmholtz Zentrum München, the German Research Center for Environmental Health) and their research teams have determined how FADS gene cluster polymorphisms affect long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in women during pregnancy.

According to the researchers, fatty acid concentrations in umbilical cord blood depend on maternal and offspring genotypes. Accordingly, maternal genotypes are mainly related with omega-6 fatty acid precursors, and offspring genotypes are related with the more highly elongated fatty acids of the omega-6 series.

The study also revealed that concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) of the Omega-3 series -main component of brain cell membranes- depend on maternal and offspring genotypes.

Dr Lattka states that “the fetal contribution of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of the omega-6 series is more relevant than expected; fetal DHA concentrations depend on maternal and fetal metabolism”, and concludes that “the amount of DHA transmitted to the fetus through the placenta might be crucial for fetal development”.

In a previous study, this research team proved that fish intake during pregnancy is correlated with the IQ in 8-year old children. The study revealed that fish intake is correlated with maternal blood DHA concentrations.

However, it has not been clarified whether maternal DHA concentrations are directly correlated with the offspring’s IQ. The NUTRIMENTHE project –which is expected to conclude in 2013 – is aimed at elucidating this question.

Last October, the researchers involved in the NUTRIMENTHE project –coordinated by the University of Granada- organized an International Symposium on “Nutrition and Cognitive Function” during the European Nutrition Conference held in Madrid.

Researchers from Belgium, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, UK, USA and Spain (Rovira i Virgili and Granada) –involved in the NUTRIMENTHE consortium- participated in this event. //EOM//

This entry was posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain and tagged , , on by .

About Bala Murali Krishna Yelchuri

Science Journalist,Media Consultant and Journalism Educator, based in Hyderabad,capital city of Andhra Pradesh State, an emerging Silicon Valley of South India.Born on August 10,1952, completed Ph.D.,M.Phil and MA in JMC, MBA in HRD,Dip in Teaching Journalism(Berlin) and Dip in Advanced Journalism(Praha). Worked for over 35 years in the premier multi-lingual national news agency - United News of India(UNI) -in different capacities and places in India. Happily married to Krishna Kumari and have daughter Krishna Jyothi(Journalist-Hyderabad) and son Vamsi Krishna(Engineer-Noida). Life member-Indian Science Writers Association and Master Resource Person to the National Council for Science and Technology Communication (NCSTC-Ministry of S&T-Govt of India). Life member Museums Association of India and President, Andhra Pradesh Journalists Union (APJU).Core committee member Malkolak Knowledge Centre,Hyderabad.

One thought on “Consuming Fish During Pregnancy Improves Child’s IQ: Study

  1. Joe Kronz

    This article fails to mention the recommended amounts of fish to eat or which types of fish to avoid. Too much fish will harm the development of a fetus’ brain and nervous system due to the mercury it contains.

    Predatory fish have a higher volume of mercury than their prey(because they are eating mercury containing fish themselves) so it would be prudent to eat less of such species and minimize overall consumption to 6-12oz. per week.

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